Home
  Home
What are the Six? Our Allies and Supporters Multimedia for Download Take Action! Upcoming Events Press Coverage
 
  Home    
Vote No on the Six!
What Are the Six? | Introduction | Measure R | Prop 1A | Prop 4 | Prop 6 | Prop 8 | Prop 9

English | Espanol | 한글
click to printPrint

Proposition 1A: A $10 Billion Rail-way Robbery
The High-speed Rail Construction Bond is a Billion dollar giveaway. General revenue bonds are a treat for construction companies and a trick for us.  Just like buying something with credit cards and bank loans, they sure sound good at first, but in the case of the state of California, at the end of the day, the interest is $1.25 million for each $1 million borrowed. Translation: $10 billion borrowed = $23 billion debt.

Titled: SB 1856 Safe, Reliable High—Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century.
See California Official Voter Information Guide Summary on Prop 1A

Proposition 1, is a proposal for $10 billion dollar bond that would be used in conjunction with $37 billion federal money (your tax money too) to build a 400-mile high-speed rail from Los Angeles to San Francisco.

General revenue bonds are a treat for construction companies and a trick for us.  Just like buying something with credit cards and bank loans, they sure sound good at first, but in the case of the state of California, at the end of the day, the interest is $1.25 million for each $1 million borrowed. Translation: $10 billion borrowed = $23 billion debt.  According to state figures, the amount of voter-approved bonds has more than doubled—from $70 billion in 2003 to $144 billion today.  To be clear, most of the bonds the state sells are general obligation bonds—meaning they are repaid from our State income and property taxes.  The state’s debt payments on about three-fourths of these bonds are made from the state’s General Fund. That means your money—money slated to pay for education, health care and other essential social services that you are most likely poorly receiving or not receiving at all from the state.  Ultimately, working class people and the poor—especially Black and Latino communities end up footing the bill.

Proposition 1 would suck billions of dollars out of truly necessary projects that serve the transit dependent throughout California.  We know that going from San Francisco to Los Angeles in two hours might sound cool but it really isn’t when you do a true cost accounting of the social consequences it has on our communities.  At the end of the day, the winners will be the state-wide rail lobby, who will fatten their pockets, getting mostly upwardly-mobile and often white train riders from LA to San Francisco, while most inner city and rural family are worried if they can travel cross town as fares go up and bus services are slashed statewide.  Environmentally many will argue that it’s a cleaner alternative to flying, but the ecological cost of diminishing resources to actually run urban and rural transit service will have major impacts on our public health and environment.  And while the promise of thousands of construction jobs in a time of high unemployment, sound goods, lets understand that at the end of the day, these jobs will go to a historically lily-white construction trade. Meanwhile Black and Brown bus riders in cities like East Oakland and South Los Angeles—who will bear part of the billion dollar debt—will still be waiting long or longer for their bus and pay higher fares.

Back to "What Are the Six?"

Also Opposed By

California High Speed Rail Land Impacts, Advocates for Coe Park, Wendell Cox, a former member of the Los Angeles County Transportation commission, cities of Menlo Park and Atherton

Supporters

The California High-Speed Rail Authority; The Transportation and Land Use Coalition (TALC), hired by California High-Speed Rail Authority; California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger; Fiona Ma, D-San Francisco; Cathleen Galgiani, D-Stockton; Jim Costa, D-Fresno; Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose

Print/Web Media

San Bernardino Sun
Ticket too costly for this train ride
Nothing about this plan makes sense except to the promoters, many of whom would profit from it if voters were foolish enough to commit the billions of dollars.
Published Oct 19, 2008 (read article)

Video (see more...)

Lissett Lazo
on Measure R and Prop 1A



 

 

Sign Up Here!
Sign here to pledge to vote No on the Six and receive our mailing list.

E-mail
Zip Code
 

Speak Out
Add your voice to the campaign - click to speak out now!

Read the Blog
Notes from our organizer's corner.

Learn More button

Volunteer

Donate Now

Share

Facebook

Myspace

youtube

Join Us

  Home | About Us | Contact Us | Site Map